The Devil’s Numbers

Devils OriginalThe Devil’s Numbers

Air force F-111 pilot Russell Cross gets a near-fatal shock when his dead Gulf War friend reappears in the cockpit. A haunted German submarine in 1915 seems destined to plunge into oblivion, if the ghosts aboard will have their way. A computer expert meets a bizarre and terrible death.

A witness to all these seemingly random events is the ghostly spectre of Matthew, a young boy who in another lifetime opened the door to an unspeakable horror. Now Matthew is preparing to wreak havoc on a luxury super-liner that could be bound for the bottom of the sea, too. And Matthew’s going to take Russell Cross with him.

Anything can happen and you might count the cost with your life, when you start doing your sums with The Devil’s Numbers.

Author’s Introduction:

It occurred to me one day that as computers “crunch” numbers faster and faster, maybe we’re coming nearer to opening hidden doors that are best left closed? Creating cracks in our dimension and time by making calculations that should never be figured out and solving puzzles that should never be answered? This is the basic idea behind The Devil’s Numbers–new technology creating an opportunity for ancient evil to step through a gap into the present day. Added to this, I’ve adapted an old, true story about a haunted German U-boat during the First World War. I came across it when I was younger and it scared the hell out of me, because it rang as so genuine–so undoubtedly true in the real sense of the word.

I had a lot of fun bringing The Devil’s Numbers all together. There’s witchcraft from hundreds of years ago, ghosts from the beginning of the twentieth century and a whole, new kind of evil born in the world today.

8 thoughts on “The Devil’s Numbers

  1. Just got home from a weeks holidays in Noosa, read this for the second (maybe third?) time. Love this book! Always gives me the heebie jeebies and I can never put it down until the last page. One of my faves!

    1. Hi Jenny, glad it’s one of your favourites! It’s a funny thing… although I never really think of any of my books as my “best” or my “worst”, I guess TDN wouldn’t be at the top of my list. However my brother always said it was by far the best of my horror books. Each to his own… thanks for commenting! Cheers, Graeme.

  2. Just reading The Devil’s Numbers- I must admit I was attracted by the use of Clive Barker’s name on the corner. I am always sceptical about comparisons, but I am really enjoying this one and got about half way in one sitting on a trip to Auckland from Melbourne, so it gets my vote! :)

    1. Thanks Steve, yes – authors and publishers (in this case Pan Macmillan) are always quick to capitalise on any mention of a “big name” in reviews! We’re a mercenary lot. Hope you read the rest of the book…

  3. The Devils Numbers was bought by me whilst combing thru op shops ( a hobby)…and not only was I blown away by the awesomeness of the novel (I love horror and scary Nazi tales)…but I was excited that the author was Australian like me!!
    Cant wait to read some more of your novels so I have joined your newsletter!!
    It is simply inexplicable that I have never seen your books on the best seller lists!!

    1. Thanks a heap for the kind words. It’s a funny thing… I never thought of The Devil’s Numbers as my best horror book, but a lot of readers reckon it is. If you had a look around my website, you’ll see I’m still writing horror and all kinds of other books, but some are only available in ebook form. You can still find some of my original horror in Oz libraries, but because they’re paperbacks they do eventually fall apart and get delisted. Otherwise, Momentum Books has them available in ebook form.
      And also thanks for joining the mailing list. I’ve been a bit slack with that (again) and your email gave me a kick up the arse to blog something new.
      Op shops, libraries… it’s all good. Finding new readers and hopefully them spreading the word about my books are way more important to me than selling copies. Cheers.

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